In the test 15 years ago: The Scythe Infinity did away with other CPU coolers

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In the test 15 years ago: The Scythe Infinity did away with other CPU coolers

With the Ninja, Scythe presented a cooler that was so good that hardly any other manufacturer could hold a candle to it. A worthy successor followed over a year later with the Infinity (test), which impressed with excellent performance and excellent workmanship at a price of less than 40 euros.

Powerful heat sink with five heat pipes

For the Infinity, Scythe relied on a mighty heat sink with dimensions of 125 × 116 × 160 mm and a weight of 960 g. A copper base plate absorbed the waste heat from the processor and conducted it to the 30 aluminum fins via the five U-shaped heat pipes. These were designed at a distance of about 3 mm and were therefore suitable for slowly rotating fans. The effective cooling surface was lush at 4,360 cm², but didn’t quite come close to the 5,400 cm² of the Zalman CNPS-9700 LED. The built-in 120 mm fan was specified with a maximum speed of 1,200 rpm, with a delivery volume of 79 m³. Thanks to the wire bracket attachment of the fan, it could be installed on any side of the cooler. In terms of compatibility, Scythe was able to come up with all common sockets. As with the Mine Cooler (tested 15 years ago), assembly was extremely easy.

  • Complete scope of delivery including silent fan

    Complete scope of delivery including silent fan

  • Image 1 of 10

    Due to the expansive dimensions, a few details had to be taken into account in terms of compatibility. The selected housing should have at least 165 mm between the mainboard and the side panel. In addition, care should be taken to handle the computer carefully as soon as the CPU cooler was installed, as the weight of 960 g placed high loads on the mainboard.

    Top performance at low volume

    In the test on a Pentium 840 Extreme Edition, the Scythe Infinity was able to convince across the board. The enclosed fan was extremely quiet even at full speed and achieved a sound pressure level of 36.5 dB (A). At 62 ° C, the CPU temperature was only marginally above 59 ° C, which the CNPS 9700 LED reached with a full 2,584 rpm at 54.1 dB (A). This enabled the Infinity to leave the very good in-house ninja behind by one Kelvin and at the same time to operate almost 8 dB (A) quieter. When the speed was reduced to 565 rpm, the cooling performance with 65 ° C CPU temperature was still excellent and the cooler was virtually inaudible at 30.4 dB (A).

    CPU cooler in performance comparison

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    Conclusion

    In the test 15 years ago, the Scythe Infinity made it very clear that high cooling performance and quiet operation do not have to be mutually exclusive. With a performance that came close to that of the best cooler tested to date, and a fan that was almost inaudible even at full speed, the Infinity knew how to please. If you were even more concerned with volume, you could make the Infinity almost completely inaudible by throttling the fan and at the same time not lose much of its performance. In addition to these qualities, the Infinity shone with excellent workmanship and easy assembly – which was particularly impressive in view of the expansive dimensions and high weight. The price of less than 40 euros made the overall package perfect. This meant that the Infinity could be recommended without reservation to anyone with enough space in the case.

    In the “Tested 15 years ago” category, the editorial team has been looking into the test archive every Saturday since July 2017. The last 20 articles that appeared in this series are listed below:

    Even more content of this kind and many more reports and anecdotes can be found in the retro corner of the ComputerBase forum.

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